Angel In Disguise

The woman beside me chuckled aloud holding up a comic book so her partner would engage in the same humor that was tickling her funny bone.

I wish I had more time, I thought, gazing out the airplane window, disheartened by my recent dismissal as vice-council of Lithuania. I hope those refugees can fill out my signed blank visa forms. God, please forgive me…help and give them your best.

With the couple now laughing uncontrollably, my heavy heart exploded mid-flight, blitzing the couple into surprise, as my heated words scorched, “why not set aside the funny book for now, huh?”

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A fictional modern story, very loosely based on Chiune Sugihara (1900-1986), a Japanese Diplomat, who saved over six thousand Polish Jews during the Holocaust.

Mr. Sugihara did use the train system rather than the airways . . . he did disobey his Japanese bosses between July 31-August 28, 1940 by painstakingly hand writing eighteen to twenty hours a day, Japanese visas, for those in need.

For his action, he suffered imprisonment, disgrace and financial hardships.

“I may have disobeyed my government, but if I hadn’t, I would have been disobeying God.” – Chiune Sugihara

::: ::: :::

Join us with your story starting every week on Wednesday . . . Friday Fictioneers.

This week’s photo source:  Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

 

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48 thoughts on “Angel In Disguise

  1. hafong says:

    Thanks for the story. I have heard of this brave Japanese man but now I know more about him. It’s good to be reminded of the goodness of the world.

    Lily

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    • Sun says:

      i must thank you for visiting, Lily, and for sure we all need to hear about those who sacrificed part of their lives to help those in great need. appreciate your viewpoint – thanks!

      Like

  2. ahtdoucette says:

    Powerful story. I like how he’s so tense he snaps at people, which really helped create this atmosphere of “no one’s perfect” and sometimes people have reasons for getting angry that we might not know about. Thanks for the educational info on Chiune Sugihara too.

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    • Sun says:

      i’m happy you noticed the opposing attitude between the characters…it must have been an ordeal for both Mr. Sugihara and those wanting to escape the horrible war situation. you’re welcome on the information and my thanks to you for sharing. have a great week.

      Like

  3. draliman says:

    I can feel your narrator’s anger and frustration finally bursting out as everyone around is having a laugh at trivial things.
    Thanks for the back story as well!

    Like

  4. Björn Rudberg (brudberg) says:

    There are always those contrasts between heavy hearts and other’s laughter. I had not heard about Chiune Sugihara before.. But of course we are well aware of Raoul Wallenberg here in Sweden.. He ultimately paid an ever higher price …

    Like

    • Sun says:

      i just looked up R. Wallenberg as i was not aware of his complex work during that awful time in history. indeed, he did pay a higher price…thanks for the insightful information, Bjorn.

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    • Sun says:

      you’re so right about obscure heroes, Patrick…they definitely get less attention. some things never change. thank you kindly.

      Like

  5. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear Angel, Great story, and I know how he feels. During 9/11, I was working at the library and the day the towers were torn down, some silly people came in and were laughing and checking out Harlequin romances and laughing – I could have screamed at them. “Don’t you know what has happened to our country?” There’s nothing wrong with the romances, it was their frivolous mood that annoyed me. Oh well, I guess some people are simple minded and can’t wrap the severity of the current events around them and/or don’t care. Wow – I must be in a bad mood or something, sorry! Good story and well written! Nan 🙂

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    • Sun says:

      one can understand back when news traveled much slower but with our modern technology it’s hard to believe a disaster such as 9-11 could slip by some people…guess we should give them the benefit of the doubt. but still…i think my feelings would have paralleled yours on the frivolous behavior over at the romance section. no need to apologize, Nan. thanks for sharing.

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  6. rochellewisoff says:

    Dear Sun,

    I have heard of Sugihara before. His story is one that should be told and retold. What we refer to as a righteous gentile.

    Well written story.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

    • Sun says:

      yes, that’s the title i read about…Righteous Gentile. i figured you would have known about Mr. Sugihara’s work and I agree, let all those ‘angels’ never be forgotten. thank you Rochelle. ♥

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    • Sun says:

      why thank you, Alicia…thought i take a detour away from evil doings and/or killing off someone. 🙂
      …and it was great learning about Mr. Sugihara. thanks for flying in a lovely comment.

      Like

  7. patriciaruthsusan says:

    Sun, I’d never heard of Mr. Sugihara so I’ve learned something reading your story. What wonderful people there are in the world. If only there were more people like him. A lovely story and well written. 🙂 —Susan

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    • Sun says:

      Susan, i’m happy and grateful to hear you enjoyed a bit about Mr. Sugihara…i was clueless as well. we need to have more stories about positive life givers rather than all the negative violent news that get prime time it seems.

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