Sometimes It’s Really Hard to Leave . . .

The frantic mom’s Facebook post status:

I can’t believe it’s time to decorate his dorm room! Where to start?!? Help!!! Online, go to the mall, what??

Several close friends liked and generously offered their suggestions.

“Aw, come on, Mom, Facebook? . . . Really? I don’t need my dorm room decorated!”

“I just want to make sure . . . Could I at least hang a scripture verse?”

“Mom, seriously, relax! I brought stuff from home and whatever else I need the graduation gift cards will take care of it.”

“But . . . Alright, give your momma a hug!”

::: ::: :::

Inspiration: Friday Fictioneers! A weekly 100-word writing challenge that features a photo prompt. The goal, to create a story with a beginning, middle and end.

Link up your story and enjoy this growing writing community!

Photo Source: Jennifer Pendergast

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39 thoughts on “Sometimes It’s Really Hard to Leave . . .

  1. www.ginabriganti.com says:

    It’s getting to be that time of year again, isn’t it? The time of year when first year college students discover that toothpaste and bathroom tissue don’t restock themselves.

    Great story, Sun!

    Like

    • Sun says:

      yah, Alistair, i also wonder how parent birds see things when they finally get their youngsters out from the nest . . . hmm. 🙂

      Like

  2. rochellewisoff says:

    Dear Sun,

    Dear Mom,
    Turn off your computer, get off the chair and have a face to face talk with your child. It works better than Facebook messages.

    Good story and a rather sad commentary on modern day communication.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

    • Sun says:

      Dear Rochelle, 🙂
      but, but . . . it’s so much easier to text, tweet or fb someone even if they may be sitting right across or (gasp) next to you. *laughing*
      and you’re so right, Rochelle, about this modern day communication breakdown going on as we blog chat. your insightful comment greatly appreciated.

      Like

    • Sun says:

      aloha Doug! and it must be equally hard as well saying no to the mother who finds it hard to let go. tough battle. have yourself a wonderful week. 🙂

      Like

    • Sun says:

      one of the downfalls of social media – the parent/child or adult child situations. sticky grounds for sure, Patrick. 🙂

      Like

    • Sun says:

      *laughing very hard* well, Milu, at least your business stayed between you and your parents on the phone line and not shared with the whole social media world. 😛 i would say that’s a good thing 🙂

      Like

    • Sun says:

      delightful, comment, Mary! as one goes off to learn independence, the other strives to find the easiest way to be less dependent oriented. life goes on . . . 🙂

      Like

    • Sun says:

      Wonderful, you spotted the mother’s last effort, Anne. 🙂 for sure social media can make family drama quite interesting at times.

      Like

  3. hafong says:

    I don’t have children so at least I won’t get the empty nest thing, but that doesn’t mean I don’t feel their anxiety.

    Lily

    Like

    • Sun says:

      so true, Lily – we can all empathize with the anxiety felt from both the child and the parent(s). have yourself a wonderful week. 🙂

      Like

    • Sun says:

      hopefully in time the mother will find the peace needed to set her adult child free. i see it like the mother is now taking the baby steps to learn a new way of living . . . so interesting the way life cycles flow. thank you, Sarah.

      Like

    • Sun says:

      *laughing* okay, Celestine. 🙂 i’m thinking, though, when the time comes, you will manage just fine. bloggers are good like that. ha-ha. 😛

      Like

  4. patriciaruthsusan says:

    Sun, Just about everything’s been said already. My children were very independent so I left them go without much comment. If they wanted help, they asked and I gave it. My son was already sharing a house with friends and working when he started college. My daughter only lived in a dorm her first year, then came back to the college branch in the city where we lived. She spent her last year sharing a house with friends. Good story and true for many. Well written. 🙂 —Susan

    Like

    • Sun says:

      well, Susan, it sounds like your children received top notch skills while growing up and surely that must have made the transition into adulthood easy for them and you. congratulations, and thank you for this wonderful comment. ♥

      Like

  5. WeaverGrace says:

    You got me laughing when the first response was from the son in question 🙂 The issue of broadcasting posts to your whole social media world turned me off of Facebook from Day 1. This mother’s son, and many other people, don’t need to see her request. She can consult them in other ways. That’s why I’m a big fan of google+ and its circles: so posts can be directed to groups of specific people.

    I like how Mom pulled on her online resources.

    I wish you had a word allowance for more responses to Mom’s post 🙂

    Like

    • Sun says:

      the way we use social media has definitely made an impact on how we communicate these days. i love it when you can be in a same room with someone and instead of talking face to face they message you on your phone. like, really!?!
      i enjoyed reading your comment, Grace. 🙂

      Like

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