SUNDAY POST : Toys

This week on Jakesprinter’s  SUNDAY POST, the topic is on Toys… photograph, toy, brain,educational toy

We can fill a child’s world with many, many fancy toys, electronic games and gadgets, but the one toy that seems neglected, especially in the traditional sense, is the storybook.

If more children had as many books as part of their “toy” collection as their huge assortment of random plastic toys, and these books read aloud to them everyday, perhaps fewer developmental speech delays would occur in young children.

I work with nursery age children. Occasionally we have children between the ages 2-4 who come to the nursery and speak gibberish. Seriously.

They look at you and speak as if they are carrying on a sensible conversation. One boy actually got upset when I tried to correct some of the words I thought he mispronounced. What!?!

Further, you know I always ask the parent(s) whose child communicates in the gibberish dialect the one big question. (I know the answer before they speak it out loud.)

Me: “Do you read aloud to your child everyday?”

Parent: “No.”

There you go. I am no expert in anything and more so when it comes to language and communication skills development in very young children, but my instincts do tell me that reading aloud everyday to a young child must help boost the ability to speak coherently.book, reading, literacy, toys, photograph

I think surrounding your young child with great story and picture books, in addition to reading aloud from these books are perfect educational toys.

Now, I did come across one parent who admitted she did not know how to read herself. At least she admitted it. In cases like this, I would at least seek out, if available, either a public library read aloud program for young children or perhaps finding a teen willing to either volunteer (as a community project) or be paid a small sum to read aloud to children whose parents cannot read.

Finally, I say, reach out, especially if you have young children in your care and give the very best educational toy to children everywhere…the brain…nourish it with good books and read aloud time. That way you can be sure the brain can avoid speaking in the gibberish dialect.

That is all. My rant over gibberish dialect is over. Thank you.

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What educational toys do you suggest as tools to help develop coherent speech patterns in young children?

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Please check out a few creative contributors below and articles on importance of reading in young children:

 

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30 thoughts on “SUNDAY POST : Toys

  1. fgassette says:

    I agree with you and very well said. Doesn’t sound like a rant to me, just speaking the truth with love. Oh by the way, good selection for challenge.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  2. Caddo Veil says:

    What an Excellent post, Sunshine!! Bravo!! Reading is crucial–not just for language development, but for sparking the imagination, broadening mental horizons. I used to read to my younger siblings, 1000 years ago–and I still remember how my youngest one would imitate my inflection when it was his turn to read the story back to me. He couldn’t read yet, you understand, but after unending repetitions he could remember the story–and how to “accent” the different characters–very well! God bless your week–love, sis Caddo

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    • Sunshine says:

      I can see how easy it is to forget about the importance of read aloud to young ears with all the computer and electronic games tagged as “educational” these days, but really, time and again, it never fails…young children (even with a video show going on in another room) will bring a book from the shelf and want to curl up in your lap for you to read it to them. If that is not a BIG hint on the importance of reading aloud then, I throw up my hands in bewilderment. Lol.
      Thanks for the weekly blessing, sis…have yourself a good one as well! 🙂

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  3. Life in the 50's and beyond... says:

    This is so true. As Caddo said so well, model the things your child should do. So important. I was always amazed that some of my high school special ed students did not know familiar nursery rhymes and childhood songs. Another good way to encourage language skills.
    n addition to books, I think it’s important that children learn to imagine and pretend. No fancy toys needed. Cardboard boxes will do. ,

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    • Sunshine says:

      Hello, Retired Ruth! A couple of high school (now graduated) special ed kids that I knew also lagged in language skills, specifically reading at grade level, that led to poor performance in all other subjects. They both were in and out of foster care during their crucial early learning years that proves your point the importance of teaching by examples. If all the adults are modeling crap, then expect the children to be stunted and lacking in so many ways. One can only hope the disadvantaged young children can have at least a place to come for a few hours to enjoy themselves in a safe and loving environment. Thanks for sharing and yes, the simple toys are really the best. 🙂

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  4. philosophermouseofthehedge says:

    The “toys” children need at this age are:
    Someone reading at least once a day in clear speech and talking back and forth about the story.
    “Walks” out of the house ( nature walks outside in yard/park/zoo/even down the street, grocery store – but shopping at mall doesn’t count) with dialogue about what is seen.
    A bin of sand / water/ rice to mush around in and pour into containers.
    Playdough (make your own. Improves fine motor skills and strengthens finer muscles to prepare for writing later.
    And big pieces of cardboard to draw and paint (use leaves, sticks, brooms, feathers and stuff as brushes) And after done/dry have kid dictate a few words or a story about what the painting is – and adult prints words as they talk( use thick marker) and the page is taped to art work.
    Sing those nursery rhymes! important
    What you have written is very true and insightful
    Great deal of research backs you up. Good job!

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    • Sunshine says:

      Thank you, Phil!! I am so happy with your list…it’s soooo common sense! And guess what? Most of the simple activities you mention bring great delight to the kids. I have witnessed it with my own eyes!!! Thanks for spending the extra minutes to share this great list. 🙂

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  5. Arindam says:

    You spread an important message with it. My mother was a teacher, so I remember since my childhood days she kept on telling me to read aloud. But unfortunately I did not. Now there are many word which I pronounce in a wrong way. 🙂 Let me tell you you are doing a great job by helping so many kids to learn valuable aspects like these. Good Luck, Sunshine.

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    • Sunshine says:

      You bring kind words, Arindam…thank you and I am sure when you have your little ones, you will be like your own mother encouraging them to read and do other good things that will help them later in life. It shows in what you write so passionately about…your heart thoughts.

      Teachers and caretakers are just a small part in a young child’s life…the parents/guardians ultimately have the biggest role in forming the future…may they always ask for Divine wisdom.

      Thank you!!! 🙂

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  6. babyjill7...Marilyn Griffin says:

    Great post…Some thought our Special Ed kids would not be able to read…We proved them wrong with repetition…asking questions to find out if they understood the words…and reading…reading…reading…whatever the subject…We would read signs along the road…in the school hallway…wherever there were words we read…Parents were elated…and books became more important!

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    • Sunshine says:

      Oh, Marilyn, this is a wonderful note about taking for granted the great wonder our mind can become with enough persistence and loving guidance. I can imagine the parents happiness but I bet the students who learned to read were lifted up to a new dimension…not to mention a super boost of self confidence!

      Many, many thanks for sharing your experience in this area…:)

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  7. marymtf says:

    I can so relate to your post. My three year old grandson and I have made a tradition of going to the local library once a week when I visit. He raids the shelves and brings his finds to me. We sit on bean bags while I read, then discuss the story. Afterwards we do lunch; a sandwich and a strawberry milkshake. Put in now, what you expect to get out later.
    PS. Save all those hard copy books while you can. Reading to your children off an iPod just isn’t the same.

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    • Sunshine says:

      Mary, it is so wonderful to hear about your trips to the local library with your young grandson…it is never to early to take them. He will remember those trips and I bet will continue to love the library visits even as he gets older. Fantastic!!

      I like your mantra:
      “Put in now, what you expect to get out later.”
      This is so true…

      Yes, I save all kinds of books…actually an obsessed book addict when it comes to library book sales…used book and thrift stores…garage sales…Yikes!!

      I have to admit I am also a lover of e-books as well. Kids now days are so into tech and if they will read from an e-book, I am happy.

      Thank you, Mary!!

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  8. Colline says:

    Too true. I know we have as many books in our household – maybe more – than toys. And yet so many children have none even though their toy bins are overflowing. Their lack truly shows when they struggle with their school work in later years.

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    • Sunshine says:

      I would have guessed, Colline, your home to be filled with many books as your writing shows you to be an avid book reader/collector…

      You know my “how-could-you” eyes always turn to the parent/guardians when toy bins are larger than their personal bookshelves…as my inner thoughts scream: “Why are you wasting your kids precious mind!!!”

      Okay, I better not get too excited…and I do thank you for sharing your important message: Give your child the most important toy–books and the love for reading, so they will not have to “struggle with their school work in later years” AMEN!!

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  9. Angelia Sims says:

    That’s one thing we have covered, We read A LOT of books out loud. The girls love it. It is a wonderful past time. So nice of you to bring this up, it is important and really fun. 🙂

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    • Sunshine says:

      Reading aloud is so simple yet often not thought of as important…your gals are very lucky…wish more parent/guardians would have more common sense when it comes to their kids.

      Hey, maybe someone could make a common sense app for child rearing…haha…:)
      Thanks, Angelia 🙂

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  10. eof737 says:

    We tread aloud in my household and also used talking books too… Because we all learn differently; using multiple modes of learning is always a good idea. and toys can be a fun learning aid. 😉

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    • Sunshine says:

      I love the talking books and I agree having all types of books and learning tools. It is easy to forget that we all learn differently…

      Thanks, Elizabeth, for your insight on different ways of learning.

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