SUNDAY POST : Close -up–The Cicada

Like it or not, the massive insect world spans across the entire world, and if one is not at all squeamish, a culinary delight can easily be made using one of the larger insects: the big one, called the cicada.

cicada, food source, sunday post, up-close, nature, insect

Dinner anyone?

With over 2,500 species of cicadas with its average length of 2-1/2-3 inches long, this hard shell-like skin bug is known as a tasty delicacy in many cultures. From ancient Greece , to the American Indians and other countries such as China, Malaysia, Burma, Latin America and the Congo, dining on a plate full of cicadas is not only nutritional but low in fat and high in protein as well.

Remember, when cicada hunting, however, try to capture the meatier female cicada population and if, by accident you over hunt, it is good to know, over in China, there is a way to use the cicada shells in traditional medicine.

(You may need to search out a medicine person specializing in cicada shell remedies if you plan to self-treat yourself with cicada meds. Just saying.)

Please, whatever you do, do NOT ask me to help you hunt for these bulging eyed, noisy and alien looking “tree crickets,“ because, up-close, these bugs look scary and did you know some cicadas are able to produce such high sounds, “enough to cause permanent hearing loss in humans should the cicada sing just outside the listener’s ear?” (Wikipedia: the go-to place for all your learning needs! )

Hey, remember to wear some earplugs when hunting. Okay?

Right on, then…let us all dig in…there is plenty of deep-fried, stir-fried and even a pizza cicada dishes to go around and for dessert, cicada candy, of course, and more than enough for this whole crowd! Yay!!

Why not, get close-up into the big bug world and Consider the cicada to be an important food source.

****

Now, enough on the cicada, close-up, what other bug dish did you bring to this simply charming bug potluck?

****

Why not join us over at the weekly community of SUNDAY POST : this week is >Close -up, hosted by Jakesprinter.

Advertisements

32 thoughts on “SUNDAY POST : Close -up–The Cicada

    • Sunshine says:

      Hello Carolisle,
      The cicada as odd as it looks is an interesting insect and I am glad you have fond memories of them.
      Thank you for sharing in the conversation…:)

      Like

  1. babyjill7...Marilyn Griffin says:

    Sitting in our swing and the sound was almost deafening…They sure know how to do what they do!…I have to say…”I haven’t been hungry enough to eat any bugs…Not to say if I had to I wouldn’t…Just no desire!”…along with some sorts of seafood…

    Like

    • Sunshine says:

      Just to look at a cicada brings no desire to consume them, Marilyn, but perhaps if a fine dining restaurant had them as a featured delicacy entree, it may tempt me to give it a small taste. Ugh, at this point, though, it does seem a bit disgusting…then again, by their gigantic size, I bet cicadas would be great to have around during a major famine.
      I pray we never have to experience one anytime soon…:(
      Thanks, Marilyn! 😉

      Like

    • Sunshine says:

      Haha, MJ! Jon Secada looks like a great performer and mmm, gotta love that Cuban latin beat…oh, yeah! 🙂
      I think we should save the cicada buffets for famine situations only. Sounds like a good plan, eh?
      I’m going to check in on Mr. Secada now…and I’ll take that hamburger now. 😉
      …wait, do NOT forget the golden fries!!

      Like

  2. Caddo Veil says:

    So, are they really that colorful, or is the photo enhanced? It’s gorgeous as a work of art, though I’ll pass on bugs as food, thanks. God bless you, Sunshine–love, sis Caddo

    Like

  3. ansuyo says:

    Eeeeeew. Not gonna happen! I will forever be denied the delicacies for my inability to place a bug of any kind in my mouth on purpose :). The few I have eaten accidentally did not taste good btw. I guess it’s good to know if I’m ever that hungry. It was good enough for John the Baptist. Angie 🙂

    Like

Comments are closed.